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Reader's View: These are dark days for democracy

Domestic and international political changes are having profound effects on our lives. Democracy, as Americans know it, is waning.

Reflecting national Republican (conservative) values, regulations are being relaxed to please Republican donors. The recent tax law gave 75 percent of benefits to the wealthy and large corporations, attempts to dismantle the Affordable Care Act (Obamacare) will leave millions without insurance coverage to obtain medical care, banks and Wall Street are being allowed to take us back to the era that led to the 2008 Bush recession, and lower environmental standards threaten to lead to the destruction of our natural environment. The president and Congress are doing this without bipartisan support.

Gerrymandering and voter restrictions have given Republicans advantages in many voting districts. The president attacks the mass media, refuses to fill open positions in federal agencies, and increasingly makes unilateral decisions.

Couple this information with the worldwide movement (through faked elections) toward dictatorship in many nations — such as Russia, China, Venezuela, and formerly communist nations — and a bleak picture emerges for democracy.

The U.S. has a democratically elected government with a free-market economic base. When the fall of communist governments occurred in 1989, it was claimed a "new world order" was coming. Based on the American model of democracy and free-market economy, peace would ensue.

However, as evidenced in China and Russia, a new governing model, based on a somewhat free-market economy, dictatorship and its attendant police state is seriously challenging the U.S. and is attractive to others. The problem is not America's lightly regulated economy but in our congress and administration, which have created paralysis.

Primarily, this began during the national Republicans' obstruction of President Barack Obama, but now it is because of their inability to govern. It's time to make a change.

Donald E. Maypole

Lake Nebagamon

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