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Radinovich launches tour in Duluth

Joe Radinovich, DFL candidate for the Minnesota 8th Congressional District talks with a group of people during an event at Clyde Iron Works in Duluth. Radinovich started an 18-day/18-county listening tour by meeting leaders and people from Duluth Tuesday evening. (Clint Austin / caustin@duluthnews.com)1 / 4
Joe Radinovich, DFL candidate for the Minnesota Eighth Congressional District listens to Glen Cunningham of Duluth during an event at Clyde Iron Works. Radinovich started an 18-day/18-county listening tour in Duluth Tuesday evening. --- Clint Austin / caustin@duluthnews.com2 / 4
Joe Radinovich, DFL candidate for the Minnesota 8th Congressional District talks with Russ and Lorraine Mattson of Two Harbors during an event at Clyde Iron Works. Radinovich started an 18-day/18-county listening tour in Duluth Tuesday evening. (Clint Austin / caustin@duluthnews.com)3 / 4
Joe Radinovich, DFL candidate for the Minnesota 8th Congressional District talks with a group of people during an event at Clyde Iron Works Tuesday. (Clint Austin / caustin@duluthnews.com)4 / 4

Prior to attending the first of 18 listening sessions in 18 counties in 18 days, 8th Congressional District DFL candidate Joe Radinovich went for a run Tuesday at the Duluth YMCA.

If his first listening session was an indication, he'll need to keep running hard.

Among the two dozen-plus people who showed up to meet with Radinovich at Clyde Iron Works in the Lincoln Park neighborhood of Duluth was Renee Van Nett — Duluth city councilor and an undecided voter in the Democratic-Farmer-Labor Party.

"He's in my district, so I had to see," said Van Nett of Radinovich's visit. "We'll see what happens. He knows I'm undecided."

Radinovich, Michelle Lee, Jason Metsa and Kirsten Kennedy are vying for the DFL nomination in the 8th District primary election in August. Republican Pete Stauber and Independence Party candidate Ray "Skip" Sandman will represent their parties in the November midterm election.

Like Van Nett, Bob Forte came to the Radinovich event as an undecided voter. Forte liked that the DFL race features four options.

"We'll whittle it down to the one we like," he said.

Forte lives and works in Duluth. He said his work is involved in the steel industry and that he loves to fish on Lake Superior — putting him at the crossroads between mining and the environment.

"It's a tricky balance," Forte said, "between mining and non-mining."

Radinovich gave a brief and familiar stump speech. He stressed the changing face of work in America and how technology and mechanization are altering the landscape. In order to maintain order through the changes, Americans will need a highly skilled labor force built upon better child development, the candidate said among other things.

It was time for the DFL party to come together, he said, following a divided endorsement convention in April which yielded no preferred candidate.

"We need to talk to each other," Radinovich said, "and we need to listen to each other."

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